History of the Claque (Pt. 1): A Look Into Entertainment’s Original Laugh Track

Concert-goers haven’t always erupted in immediate applause at the end of a show. You might be surprised to learn that clapping as we know it — immediate, mandatory applause after a performance — couldn’t be taken for granted prior to the 20th century. That was due in part to the “claque.” Keep reading to learn ...

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Listen To the Hiroshima Symphony

You can’t truly understand the subject of “Ghosts of Hiroshima,” our podcast episode, without giving a listen to the Hiroshima Symphony. Here is a recording of the Japan Philharmonic performing Masao Ohki’s most famous work, followed by notes from the American Record Guide (as printed on the Naxos website). [embed height="560" width="315"]https://www.youtube.com/embed/0nQjf0mwuqw[/embed] Listen to the ...

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Listen to the “Santa Claus Symphony” by William Henry Fry (1813-1864)

https://www.youtube.com/embed/dkoDYsrNUyI [embed width="560" height="315"]https://www.youtube.com/embed/dkoDYsrNUyI[/embed] You already know about the American composer from episode 7 of Backstage Podcast, and you can also listen to Leonora by William Henry Fry on our website (we’ve included some biographical info). Fun Fact: The Santa Claus Symphony was the first orchestral work to use the saxophone. While it only takes ...

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The Playwright of the Original “Barber of Seville” Was First a Famous Watchmaker

Remember “The Most Interesting Man In The World” (otherwise known as the single greatest act of advertising in recent memory)? He could go anywhere, do anything, and be anything he wanted to be. Yes, the Dos Equis guy was a fictional character created to sell beer. But the subject of this article was indeed a ...

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